Palace Hotel

Starwood Group


2 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco


Background History

Inspired by visionary, William Ralston, the Palace Hotel was the result of one man's dream of turning the city from boom town into a booming metropolis, simply by erecting a hotel of timeless elegance and unprecedented luxury.

On October 2, 1875, the Palace Hotel opened its doors to great acclaim.

Then, in 1906, a massive earthquake shook all of San Francisco. The Palace survived the quake, but was overtaken by fires that engulfed the city in its wake.

The grand dame hotel went down in a blaze of glory and was gutted by flames, not reopening until 1909. In January 1989, the Palace closed again for a major restoration. Two years later, San Francisco witnessed the rebirth of the Palace Hotel.

Our Role

Working with general manager Don Timbie and Stanford Hughes, of Brayton Hughes Design Studio, we produced public exhibits capturing the Hotel's history, organized its archives and created memoriabilia displays in the lobbies. After the Hotel re-opened in 1991, we continued to assist the Hotel with services in architectural photography, graphic design, and merchandise production.











Scroll the images above to view those used throughout the Hotel

Purchase San Francisco historical images from our web galleries here

Historic Tours at The Palace Hotel





The Main Corrider of the Palace Hotel
features four ornate brass vitrines that display historical
artifacts and photographs of the Palace Hotel.





Palace Hotel, Mezzanine Level, Meeting Room




This Brochure was used to promote the Palace Hotel circa 1920


"The Pied Piper of Hamelin"
American artist, Maxfield Parrish, created this
mural-sized painting after the Palace's 1909 re-opening.
During Prohibition, the mural was moved to the Rose Room
and later was transferred to its namesake
and permanent home, the Pied Piper Bar.


As part of our heritage exhibit project for the Palace Hotel,
we managed the installation of this $3-5 million dollar painting over the bar.